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Σάββατο, 9 Ιουλίου 2016

They cannot recruit caregivers... is this a good thing?

In short I have been following the work of Gwen Wyatt right from the beginning.
Her research has been of benefit to all an undeniable fact.

Read here 

But after her initial research she went a step further in her research where 

"The objective of this work was to design and create a robotic reflexology device that would deliver a breast cancer-specific reflexology protocol to the feet of patients."

This in the beginning did not sound good to me...

"What is she doing, she will take us out of buisness!"


Recently she tried to recruit caregivers to offer the Reflexology but this proved to be difficult.

RESULTS:

Almost one-third of patients were found to be ineligible due to the lack of a caregiver to participate with them and provide this form of social support. Among eligible patients, the consent rate for this dyadic study is much lower than that of previous RCTs of reflexologist-delivered reflexology that enrolled just patients, not dyads.

CONCLUSION:

Implications for nursing practice and research include addressing the need for greater social support for patients and strategies for problem-solving refusal reasons during study enrollment.

Dyadic recruitment in complementary therapy studies: experience from a clinical trial of caregiver-delivered reflexology.

Abstract here
Certainly raises a lot of questions regarding the application of reflexology and our profession!
Hope you dwell on them!

Here is Gwen explaing what reflexology is...
Wyatt, PhD, RN, Professor, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, describes reflexology treatment for patients with breast cancer.

Reflexology is not massage, it is a specific pressure most commonly applied to the foot. The thumb-walking motion across the reflexes located on the foot provides a "good hurt" with firm pressure, Wyatt says.
The deep pressure from reflexology should not be painful and does not cause tissue damage. If done correctly, a patient should help to monitor pain, as they should be receiving benefit on reflexes without pain.

http://nursing.onclive.com/oncnurse-tv/Gwen-Wyatt-on-Reflexology-Treatment-for-Breast-Cancer